Learn more about Beacon House, the best addiction treatment center in Northern California.

Our addiction treatment staff is committed to helping every individual who walks through our doors. We’ll help you understand and embrace the principles and tools to achieve lasting sobriety. Therefore, learn more about Beacon House, the best addiction treatment center in Northern California.

We strongly believe in treating the whole person, not just the symptoms of addiction. Identifying and treating the underlying issues is critical to a successful and lasting recovery. Our Beacon House professionals follow custom treatment programs that address the needs of our individual clients.

Specifically, with over 60 years of experience, we know what works best in building the foundation to achieve a lifetime of recovery.

The Best Addiction Treatment Center in Northern California

At Beacon House, our team of experts knows that support after treatment to prevent relapse is important. Moreover, the most successful recoveries result from a conscious commitment to acknowledging recovery. In addition, this process is one day at a time. By staying in touch with alumni, we honor our commitment to aide in the success of our clients.

We are about a lifetime of recovery – not just a short-term stay in a recovery center.

About Beacon House: A Lifetime of Recovery

Beacon House is proud to call the quaint, coastal town of Pacific Grove, California home, just minutes from the scenic Monterey Bay coastline, as well as the world-famous Monterey Bay Aquarium, the nearby gates of Pebble Beach, and Carmel-by-the-Sea.

Founded in 1958 by Mary Clark Ross, an alcohol educator, and Dr. Donald Taugher, Beacon House was among the first 12-Step residential treatment centers in the Western U.S. Ross worked for years with Mrs. Marty Mann, the President and Founder of the National Council on Alcoholism (NCA), who established a local chapter in Pebble Beach and was the first sober woman in Alcoholics Anonymous. The 12-Step approach remains at the core of the programs at Beacon House.

Beacon House received significant early financial support from Samuel F.B. Morse, founder of the resort of Pebble Beach and a famous philanthropist and visionary. Together, they established the life-changing recovery program at Beacon House as a way to help others impacted by the disease of addiction. In 1961, Beacon House moved into a cherished, Victorian-era mansion that we still call home today, and in 1964, we received our non-profit status. Since our opening in 1958, we have helped thousands achieve lasting sobriety, supported in part by the generosity of donors and alumni.

With over 60 years of treatment experience, Beacon House remains in Pacific Grove, CA, and continues to be dedicated to healthy, long-lasting, and life changing recovery– both during and after treatment. Our detox, residential, outpatient, and aftercare/ alumni programs provide supportive rehab services in a safe, comfortable environment– a truly unique stepping stone to a lifetime of recovery from alcohol and other drugs.

Beyond the day-to-day work with clients, Beacon House leadership also works diligently to the advancement of modern treatment solutions. In 2017, the Board of Directors decided to seek partnership with a larger organization, and in March of 2018 affiliated with Gateway Foundation, a nonprofit based out of Chicago, IL. Together, Beacon House and Gateway Foundation are bringing the world’s most innovative thinkers in addiction recovery to California’s Central Coast. We share the latest advances in research and medical science, contributing to the evolving field of addiction treatment.

Architectural History

Learn more about Beacon House, the best addiction treatment center in Northern California.Beacon House, originally built in 1902, became home to H.J. Osborn, an investor from Cleveland, Ohio. The house was designed by California architects, Frank Wolfe and Charles McKenzie. Each is known for their distinctive style, emerging as one of the grandest showpieces on the Monterey Peninsula. Wolfe and McKenzie design hundreds of structures, primarily residences, throughout Northern California. According to the book Cottages, Flats & Bungalows, 102 Designs from Wolfe & McKenzie by George Espinola, “Wolf and McKenzie defined the residential character of San Jose during its transition from the Victorian to the modern era.” In this book are plans for 468 Pine Avenue, Pacific Grove, the home that is now known as the Beacon House.

Among the many rooms which include a parlor, library and sitting room, the Beacon House has an expansive floor plan for its time. Furthermore, exquisite oval windows on the front of the second story with decorative devices are distinct exterior features highlighting the era. The beautiful roof, use of pillars on the porch and in the interior, and the design of the central entry hall are stand-out architectural elements. A Victorian-era style is evident throughout. Specifically, in the tower, bay windows, and rich use of stained glass.

During the 1950’s, the house became Pine Manor, a guesthouse. Later in 1961, through the benevolence of Samuel F.B. Morse (Founder and President of the Pebble Beach Company) the Beacon House was able to acquire this house for the benefit of generations of clients seeking help.

Learn More About Beacon House Today

Today, the house remains true to its roots, showcasing and maintaining the numerous architectural features and its heritage. When you enter treatment with us, you will have a comforting environment to build lasting recovery. Your success and safety in treatment is our top priority. Therefore, we’ll work with you to develop a custom and unique rehab plan. This will address each of your concerns in treatment.

Do not let addiction take control of your life any longer. You can grow in sobriety with our staff by your side. To learn more about Beacon House and the best addiction treatment center in Northern California, reach out to our staff today. In fact, contact us now at 866.416.3873 for more information about us.

A Working Legacy: History Timeline